Catesby is Now Online!

By Kendall Hallberg

After months of hard work, two volumes of Mark Catesby’s Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands and the Herbert Fitzgerald’s collection of Catesby’s prints have now been uploaded to our Digital Collections repository! There’s still plenty left to do as the University Libraries are home to 5 unique, hand-painted copies of the Natural History as well as two copies of the Hortus Europae Americanus. I will still be working to create more, and better, metadata for these additional books and prints.

Uncolored illustration of bird, a ghost pipe plant, and a toad stool, created in 1731 by Mark Catesby.
Catesby’s illustration, Plate 36, “Snow-bird, Broom-rape, and Toad-stool” from Volume I, 1731.
Photograph of a white plant native to the Carolinas colloquially called an Indian Pipe or Ghost Pipe. Green foliage in background. Photo taken by Kendall Hallberg in 2021.
Photo of Ghost Pipe, or One-Flower Indian-Pipe taken at Blood Mountain, by Kendall Hallberg, 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This project and all the metadata that goes along with it would not have been possible without the assistance of the wonderful people with the Mark Catesby Centre. As I am not a naturalist, I have relied on their expertise to make this digital collection as usable as it is wonderful. I know that anyone who looks at these works will be able to learn something new about Mark Catesby and the natural world around us.

 

Illustration of a Polyphemus moth that is light brown with circular markings on its two back wings, created in 1731 by Mark Catesby.
Catesby’s illustration of a Polyphemus Moth in Plate 91 in Volume II, 1731.
Light brown moth with circular markings on its wings.
Photo of a Polyphemus Moth sitting in a potted plant taken in Columbia, SC, by Kendall Hallberg, 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have so enjoyed working on this project and learned a lot about the region I live in! While out exploring around the Southeast, I have stumbled upon some of the same things Catesby saw almost 300 years ago. Well, we all do every day, because squirrels… But some of my discoveries have been exciting for me and I spotted them either miles into the woods or on my patio.

Explore the collection! And as you explore your neighborhood, South Carolina, and the Southeast, see what you can find from Catesby’s Natural History!

 

Illustration of a mountain laurel twig with pale pink flowers and green leaves, created in 1731 by Mark Catesby.
Catesby’s illustration of Mountain Laurel, Plate 98 in Volume II, 1731.
Mountain laurel, green bush with white flowers.
Photo of Mountain Laurel taken at Blood Mountain in Georgia, by Kendall Hallberg, 2021.