AccessAble Books

Rare, unique and invaluable, these books were digitized in collaboration with the USC Press.

Alan Seeger, Le Poète de la Légion Étrangère

Alan Seeger, a poet of the Foreign Legion. His letters and poems, written during the war, are brought together here by his father and translated by Odette Raimondi-Matheron.

Alphabet Rendered Instructive and Entertaining

This beautifully illustrated alphabet book, published in 1775, is an excellent example of early children’s literature from the eighteenth century.

Belle W. Baruch Library Collection

Shallow Water Marine Benthic Macroinvertebrates of South Carolina:
Species Identification, Community Composition and Symbiotic Associations
by Richard S. Fox and Edward E. Ruppert

Bonds Conway Papers, 1763-1907

This collection of family letters, land papers, and other items documents several generations of a free family of color from the 18th through the 20th centuries in South Carolina, Georgia, Kansas, east Texas, and elsewhere.

Brief History of Moscovia

This collection includes John Milton’s A Brief History of Moscovia: and Other Less-Known Countries Lying Eastward of Russia as Far as Cathay. Gathered from the Writings of Several Eye-Witnesses and a map of Russia dating from 1625.

Camilla Urso Collection

Camilla Urso was one of the leading violinists of the 19th century. She accomplished this at a time when the violin was not considered to be a suitable instrument for a woman to play.

South Carolina and the Civil War

South Carolina and the Civil War

Poised for the sesquicentennial remembrance of the Civil War, South Carolina and the Civil War brings together eyewitness views and accounts of this period of American history, selected from the rich holdings of University of South Carolina Libraries.

Carolina Bands Collection

The Carolina Bands Collection is comprised of hundreds of letters, pages of drill, photographs, football programs, and newspaper clippings.

Carolina Students Handbook

The Carolina Student’s Handbook offers a glimpse of the campus culture at the University of South Carolina from the 1920s through the 1940s.