Meet our Spring Virtual Intern, Anthony Sax

My name is Anthony Sax and I spent the spring 2021 semester interning with the Digital Collections Department of the University of South Carolina Libraries. I am an MLIS student at the U of SC about half way through my graduate program. Working with digital collections and archival work is a relatively new experience for me. I got my undergraduate degree from Iowa State University in Supply Chain Management. I then spent a few years working in marketing and digital technology positions before deciding that I wanted to shift my career path and go back to school for my MLIS.

Map of Giuseppe Garibaldi's March to Roma [Rome] in 1848-1849
Giuseppe Garibaldi’s March to Roma [Rome] in 1848-1849
               My internship in Digital Collections also had a relatively unique structure. My internship was to work on creating metadata for the Giuseppe Garibaldi Collection. The work had already been started by a previous intern so my job was to complete the second half of the collection. In addition I live in Iowa so I did the work and coordinated with my supervisor remotely. The ongoing pandemic has unfortunately given everybody a chance to practice working remotely so the experience of working on this internship went pretty smoothly and I was very grateful to get a chance to work on a project like this despite not living in South Carolina.

The Giuseppe Garibaldi Collection is a very interesting collection of documents concerning Giuseppe Garibaldi an Italian general and patriot who lived in the 19th century. Garibaldi was a widely renowned general who played a key role in the Italian unification and the beginnings of the subsequent Kingdom of Italy. The documents in the collection consisted of a variety of types includes letters, photographs, drawings, postcards, and maps. The letters comprised the first half of the collection and the metadata for them had been completed before I started on the project. My half of the collection included photographs, drawings, postcards, and maps. The vast majority of the documents in the collection that had writing on them were not in English so I had to translate them so that I could get an understanding of what the document was. In addition to getting some great experience digging through a collection, understanding the materials, and creating metadata for them I also got to tackling running the created metadata through OpenRefine and CONTENTdm in order to upload the material into the digital collections system.

Going through the collection I found a number of items that I thought were very interesting. The ones that stood out to me the most however were the collection of maps in the collection that traced the movements that Garibaldi made in various military and exploratory engagements.

Map of Giuseppe Garibaldi's Voyages by Sea by 1824 to 1833
Giuseppe Garibaldi’s Voyages by Sea by 1824 to 1833

The Heart of the Grand Strand: Myrtle Beach

Aerial View of Myrtle Beach circa 1940, WPA Photograph Collection, South Caroliniana Library
Aerial View of Myrtle Beach circa 1940, WPA Photograph Collection, South Caroliniana Library

Contributed by Virginia Pierce and Laura Blair (2015). Edits and additions by Kate Boyd (2020).

[This blog was first written in 2015 for the Historical Newspapers. Since then we have added a number of Horry County newspapers where Myrtle Beach is located and we have scanned all of the South Carolina Postcards in our collections, which include many images of Myrtle Beach.]

The summer is in full swing and many of us are thinking about sticking our toes in the sand with the sound of crashing waves in the background.  Hitting the beach is a common getaway during the summer months and many know that one of the most popular tourist destinations along the East Coast for beach-goers is right here in South Carolina: Myrtle Beach.  Seeing several million visitors each year, Myrtle Beach sits at the heart of the Grand Strand and boasts an array of tourist attractions in addition to its sandy beaches.

Air view, Myrtle Beach, showing the piers, "America's finest strand," 1950, South Carolina Postcards, South Caroliniana Library
Air view, Myrtle Beach, showing the piers, “America’s finest strand,” 1950, South Carolina Postcards, South Caroliniana Library

In our lifetime it seems Myrtle Beach has always been the epitome of a beach destination; however, for all its popularity and success, Myrtle Beach has a relatively short history that dates back to right before the turn of the 20th century.

Situated in Horry County, the Myrtle Beach area remained uninhabited and unchanged for most of its early life. Due to its remote location, few Europeans attempted to colonize the area. It wasn’t until the 1880’s that the location began to see some settlement activity when the Burroughs & Collins Company out of Conway decided to buy land in the area for timber and set up a logging camp. Employees at the camp headed to the nearby beach on their days off. Additionally, the company built a railroad from Conway to the coastline in order to extract the timber. Once the railroad was in place and word spread of access to the coast, development in the area quickly picked up.

The "Personal" section of the Marlboro Democrat (Bennettsville, S.C.) mentions a family vacationing at the beach in 1903.
The “Personal” section of the Marlboro Democrat (Bennettsville, S.C.) mentions a family vacationing at the beach in 1903.

Initially the location didn’t have a formal name, and locals simply referred to the new train stop as New Town (perhaps in contrast to nearby Conway’s nickname of Old Town). A contest was eventually held for people to originate a name.  The winning contestant drew inspiration from the popular plant in the area, the wax myrtle, and the name Myrtle Beach was born.

Newspaper Men Meet at Myrtle Beach, Watchman and Southron, 1922, South Caroliniana Library
Newspaper Men Meet at Myrtle Beach, Watchman and Southron, 1922, South Caroliniana Library

Aside from the business potential, the Burroughs & Collins Company realized the possible tourist potential in this new area. In 1901, they built the area’s first hotel, the Seaside Inn.  A bathhouse and pavilion shortly followed. The company also began selling beachfront properties for twenty-five dollars. Throughout the summer months of the early 1900’s, the mention of Myrtle Beach in local newspapers quickly rose as families began traveling there for recreation and relaxation. The area soon became a popular destination spot, especially for those living in nearby South Carolina towns who could easily travel to the beach on a short train ride.  As early as 1902, the Watchman and Southron (Sumter, S.C.) included Myrtle Beach (via Conway) under their “Week-End Rates From Sumter to Popular Summer Resorts.” Advertisements for hotels also begin to appear in papers around the state, enticing tourists to come and stay on the “Finest Strand on the Atlantic Seaboard.”

Myrtle Beach, SC, WPA Photograph Collection, South Caroliniana Library
Myrtle Beach, SC, WPA Photograph Collection, South Caroliniana Library

By the 1920’s, other developers saw the opportunity in the growing seaside town and began to further develop the area with hotels and golf courses, all aimed at vacationers. Myrtle Beach became a popular spot, seeing even conventions and conferences come to town such as ones for the South Carolina Press Association and the [South Carolina] State Dental Association.

An article in the Watchman and Southron (Sumter, S.C.) draws attention to the upcoming South Carolina Press Association convention in Myrtle Beach in 1922. Although F. G. Burroughs (of Burroughs and Collins Company) had been the first to see the business potential in the area, it had also been his dream to see a resort town on the East Coast halfway between Miami and New York. After his death in 1897, his sons carried out his plan, developing the area and turning Myrtle Beach into one of the most popular seaside destinations in the country.

 

The Horry Herald, June 15, 1922
The Horry Herald, June 15, 1922
Camden Chronicle April 22, 1927
Camden Chronicle April 22, 1927

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Take a Tour of South Carolina with South Carolina Postcards

By Josh Schutzenhofer and Alex Trim

An Introduction

The South Carolina Postcards Collection features historic postcards from across the state of South Carolina. From Battery Park in Charleston to Table Rock Mountain in Greenville, this collection provides the perfect opportunity to get a unique and colorful glimpse of South Carolina in the 1900s. With postcards ranging from 1865 to 2016 this collection captures what the travel and tourism industry was like in the state while also giving us picturesque views of historic South Carolina. Currently housed in the South Caroliniana Library, it has quickly become one of our most popular collections.

The South Carolina Postcards collection includes all 46 South Carolina counties, 6,144 postcards, and nearly four years’ worth of work completed by three students and staff from the Digital Collections (Digi) office. The project was started in May of 2016 by Library Science graduate student, Mir Pavin. During her time in Digi, Mir completed 15 counties. After she graduated the project was shelved for nearly a year before Digi Project Assistant, Matthew Haney, began working on it. Matthew completed 13 counties. After Matthew left, the project was again shelved, thankfully just for six months this time, before it was picked up again by Josh Schutzenhofer. It was Josh who finally finished this project.

Josh and the Postcards

I am Joshua Schutzenhofer, a Library and Information Science graduate student here at USC. I have been working in digital collections for a little over a year. I started working on the South Carolina Postcards Collection in the Spring of 2019 and completed the project in early February of this year. During my time working on this project, I scanned postcards for 17 counties, including the largest county Charleston, which has over 1,000 postcards. For those who don’t know, the collection includes postcards featuring images of historical sites, churches, graves, schools, hotels, tourist attractions, bridges, monuments, train stations and depots, factories, highways, paintings, historical figures, everyday people, and advertisements.

One of my favorite postcards features a monument to the defenders of Fort Moultrie in a park in Charleston, S. C. I have always had an interest in history and the battle at Fort Moultrie was a significant event in the American Revolution, as well as the inspiration for the South Carolina Flag and the nickname “The Palmetto State.” (Did you know, we have William Moultrie’s papers? He was the person for whom the fort was named, and his papers are digitized and published online in our American Revolution in South Carolina Collection.)

Another interesting postcard I found was of the A. C. L. Passenger Station in Sumter, S. C. Trains were a key reason that several towns in South Carolina were built. I really enjoyed all the time that I spent working on this collection, seeing South Carolina throughout history in black and white, and technicolor.

The South Carolina Postcards Collection started in May of 2016 and three years and ten months later it was completed. Nearly four years after it was started digital collections has made the entire collection available online. And while it might have taken awhile to complete, it certainly proved to be an interesting and colorful collection to work with.